Araujo, Ana Lucia *

Clark-Lewis, Elizabeth *

Kerr-Ritchie, Jeffrey*

Mabeko-Tali, Jean-Michel *

Medford, Edna *

Muraya, Petronella

Scott, Daryl*

Swan, Quito *

Taylor, Nikki

Tolbert, Emory*

Toungara, Jeanne

Tozzi, Christopher

Wright-Lewis, Kay

Retired:

Carrington, Selwyn *

DeLeon, David

Dey, Balaram

Reidy, Joseph

In memoriam:

Aziz Batran (1941-2011)

* Graduate Faculty, authorized by the Graduate School to supervise MA thesis and PhD dissertations.



Faculty

Nikki Taylor

Nikki M. Taylor, Professor of History and Chair of the Department, specializes in 19th century African American History. Her sub-specialties are in Urban, African American Women, and Intellectual History. Educated at the University of Pennsylvania (B.A.) and Duke University (M.A., PhD, Certificate in Women's Studies), Dr. Taylor has won several fellowships including Fulbright, Social Science Research Council, and Woodrow Wilson.

Dr. Nikki Taylor has written three monographs. Her first book, Frontiers of Freedom: Cincinnati’s Black Community 1802-68 (2005) uses the backdrop of one of the nineteenth-century's most racist American cities to chart the emergence of a very conscientious black community--a community of people who employed various tactics such as black nationalism, emigration, legislative agitation, political alliances, self-education, and even armed self-defense to carve out a space for themselves as free people living in the shadow of slavery.

Professor Taylor’s second book, America's First Black Socialist: The Radical Life of Peter H. Clark (2013), is a political and intellectual biography of one of the foremost African American activists, intellectuals, orators, and politicians in the nineteenth-century century, whose name once was spoken in the same breath as Frederick Douglass, Dr. McCune Smith, and John Mercer Langston. This book charts Clark’s journey from recommending that slaveholders be sent to "hospitable graves," to advocating for a separate black nation, to forging alliances with German socialists and labor radicals, to adopting the conservative mantle of the Democratic Party.

Driven Toward Madness: The Fugitive Slave Margaret Garner and Tragedy on the Ohio (2016) is Dr. Taylor's third monograph. This book is a biography of Margaret Garner, an enslaved wife and mother who, along with her entire family, escaped from slavery in northern Kentucky in 1856. When their owners caught up with the Garner family, Margaret tried to kill all four of her children--and succeeded in killing one--rather than see them return to slavery. Using black feminist and interdisciplinary methodologies, Driven Toward Madness examines why this fated act was the last best option for her as an enslaved mother. Dr. Taylor's current research project is on women who participated in armed slave revolts.

Dr. Taylor joined the department in 2017.

Nikki Taylor
Professor of History and Department Chair
Ph.D., Duke University
Telephone: 202-806-9326
Fax: 202-806-4471
Email: nikki.taylor@howard.edu

 
 
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Howard University College of Arts and Sciences Department of History